A week's worth of food, around the world.

Here is a project I wish I'd done. Photographer Peter Menzel and writer Faith D'Aluisio's new book, Hungry Planet: What the World Eats, examines food and the effects of globalization.

Though the photos themselves speak volumes about hunger and injustice and wealth, I love that the families in them are smiling and welcoming the viewer into their homes. Also interesting to note: the presence of Coca Cola, processed foods, whole grains, the absence of protein and fat, the context of home versus refugee camp, and the size of families.

What does a weeks worth of food look like around the world?
Japan: The Ukita family of Kodaira City
Food expenditure for one week: 37,699 Yen or $317.25



Italy: The Manzo family of Sicily
Food expenditure for one week: 214.36 Euros or $260.11



Germany: The Melander family of Bargteheide
Food expenditure for one week: 375.39 Euros or $500.07



United States: The Revis family of North Carolina
Food expenditure for one week: $341.98



Mexico: The Casales family of Cuernavaca
Food expenditure for one week: 1,862.78 Mexican Pesos or $189.09



Poland: The Sobczynscy family of Konstancin-Jeziorna
Food expenditure for one week: 582.48 Zlotys or $151.27



Egypt: The Ahmed family of Cairo
Food expenditure for one week: 387.85 Egyptian Pounds or $68.53


Ecuador: The Ayme family of Tingo
Food expenditure for one week: $31.55



Bhutan: The Namgay family of Shingkhey Village
Food expenditure for one week: 224.93 ngultrum or $5.03



Chad: The Aboubakar family of Breidjing Camp
Food expenditure for one week: 685 CFA Francs or $1.23

See here for a few more photos and to read comments.

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2 Responses to A week's worth of food, around the world.

AfricaLive said...

So cool, right? Scary that I actually own another book by the authors: Man Eating Bugs.

nblinks said...

And I own their other book, Material World: A Global Family Portrait, where they went around to different countries and photographed families in front of their houses -- with all their possessions removed and arranged in the front yard.

I think there's sort of a photogenic-ness bell curve as the cost of a week's food increases -- first you don't have enough (Chad), then you're able to buy lots of unprocessed/packaged stuff, which looks nicer arrayed (Egypt), and then at the top end (Germany) everything's all super-packaged/processed.

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